The Effects

Post By: Adam Azzaro

We all know the short-term effects of binge drinking; getting sick, drowsiness, blurred vision, headaches, impaired judgment, loss of money, and blackouts. Blackouts can lead to short term memory loss so that the drinker can’t remember what they drank or what they did. But not every knows the harm that comes with binge drinking as you get older especially if you continue to binge drink over the years and how much, worse the effects can get.

The long-term effects don’t get any better than the short-term effects. These effects hit harder since because they put the drinkers life at risk. What are the long-term risks that come to mind right away? Injuries whether they are from falling down or getting in a car accident because of drinking and driving. There’s also jail time, because the drinker got behind the wheel of a car, which can affect whether if one gets a job or not. Problems related to family or relationships, it comes to a point where drinking becomes the drinker’s number one priority and the family/relationship is second.

There are actually long-term health implications to binge drinking that one may or may not have known about. When I thought of health implications, the only thing that came to my mind was alcohol poisoning and this is probably what most of my college peers actually think about too, but we don’t even know half of the story. Binge drinking over the long term can kill our livers, cause nerve damage, sexual problems (erectile dysfunction), permanent brain damage, and can lead to physical and mental scars from being sexually assaulted, and may even lead to cancer of the mouth and throat.

Most binge drinking takes place during the college years, 18-25 year old range, and it is estimated that more then half of college students binge drink. Binge drinking in the college years can raise your blood pressure and your cholesterol, which in time, can lead to having a stroke and/or a heart attack earlier in ones life. But previous studies have shown that binge drinking also occurs, as we get older, in fact adults aged 40-60 binge drink and admit to binging. But as we get older more risks come with binge drinking. Adults aged 40-60 who binge drink, have reported having raised risk of stroke, heart attacks, and death. Do you see the connection?

Now when you sit down and you read this you might think to your self, “this will never happen to me.” But actually alcohol related deaths are the third leading way of dying in the United States. Alcohol related deaths actually account for more then 75,000 deaths in the US every year. That number consists of car accidents and heath issues that were connected to the use of alcohol.

Yes these statistics are scary but this doesn’t mean you have to stop drinking. Just be aware and be safe.

 

References:

Alcohol Use and Cancer. (n.d.). Alcohol Use and Cancer. Retrieved November 27, 2013, from http://www.cancer.org/cancer/cancercauses/dietandphysicalactivity/alcohol-use-and-cancer

Alcohol linked to 75,000 U.S. deaths a year. (2005, June 25). msnbc.com. Retrieved November 27, 2013, from http://www.nbcnews.com/id/6089353/#.UpY0C

Paddock, C. (2013, April 24). Binge Drinking In College Years May Raise Risk For Heart Disease. Medical News Today. Retrieved November 27, 2013, from http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/259560.php

Short and Long Term Effects of Alcohol – Effects of Binge Drinking – Truth About Alcohol. (n.d.). Short and Long Term Effects of Alcohol – Effects of Binge Drinking – Truth About Alcohol. Retrieved November 24, 2013, from http://www.drugfreeworld.org/drugfacts/alcohol/short-term-long-term-effects.html

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